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Employment Equity Report 2015–2016

Employment Equity Report 2015–2016 [PDF 8036 KB]

ISSN 1929-2511

Employment Equity Report 2015-2016

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction

  1. 1.1 The Organization
  2. 1.2 Analysis

2.0 Employment Equity Initiatives

  1. 2.1 Aboriginal Engagement Program
  2. 2.2 Persons with Disabilities
  3. 2.3 Other Initiatives

3. 0 Workforce Analysis

  1. 3.1 Data Availability
  2. 3.2 Employee Population
  3. 3.3 Self-Identification
  4. 3.4 Analysis

4.0 Analysis of Total Employee Population

5.0 Analysis by Employment Equity Occupational Groups

  1. 5.1 Senior Managers
  2. 5.2 Middle Managers
  3. 5.3 Professionals
  4. 5.4 Semi-Professionals and Technicians
  5. 5.5 Supervisors
  6. 5.6 Administrative and Senior Clerical
  7. 5.7 Skilled Crafts and Trades
  8. 5.8 Clerical Personnel
  9. 5.9 Semi-Skilled Workers
  10. 5.10 Summary

6.0 Analysis of the Numbers of Employee Hires, Promotions and Regrettable Departures

  1. 6.1 Employee Hires
  2. 6.2 Employee Promotions
  3. 6.3 Employee Regrettable Departures
  4. 6.4 Summary

7.0 Conclusion

List of Tables

1.0 Introduction

The human resources management focus of the National Energy Board (NEB) is to ensure it has the right people, at the right time, for the right jobs. The NEB is committed to providing an inclusive workplace. The cornerstones of our initiatives are based on the legislative requirements under the Employment Equity Act.

Employment Equity looks at the following groups when determining gaps in a work force: [1] Women, [2] Aboriginal People, [3] Visible Minorities and [4] Persons with Disabilities.

This annual report provides a description of Employment Equity activities at the NEB and an analysis of the results achieved during the reporting period from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016. In addition, the report provides a workforce description of the employees at the NEB as of 31 March 2016 and includes an analysis of internal representation versus labour market availability.

1.1 The Organization

The NEB is an independent federal regulator that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources. It makes decisions and recommendations on applications for pipeline facilities that cross international or interprovincial borders, associated tolls and tariffs, international power lines and certain energy export and import authorizations. In specified areas the NEB has regulatory responsibilities for oil and gas exploration and production activities. The NEB regulates companies to conduct their activities safely in order to eliminate or reduce risk for the public, workers, the environment, and property over the full lifecycle of an energy infrastructure project.

The majority of employees of the NEB are headquartered in Calgary. The NEB–established regional offices in Montreal and Vancouver as of 1 April 2015. Since February 2004, all unionized employees have been represented by the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC), the one union certified as the bargaining agent for the NEB.

1.2 Analysis

Data Sources: This report uses 2011 Census Availability data received from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) to compare overall representation of the designated groups (Women, Aboriginal People, and Visible Minorities) at the NEB with the composition of the local population (Calgary). Persons with Disabilities data is at the national level as those statistics are not available at the local level. In previous years the NEB has used national data for all groups; utilizing Calgary data provides a more accurate comparison. Please note that the workforce population is aged 15 years and older.

2.0 Employment Equity Initiatives

Given the NEB’s unique role, one of the greatest challenges is to attract and retain expert staff. The NEB Employment Equity and Diversity Plan (EEDP) 2013–2016 recognizes we must embrace and represent diversity to enable us to achieve excellence through our employees. It is important to move beyond considering diversity as a purely intellectual exercise to it becoming an inherent component of our organizational culture.

2.1 Aboriginal Engagement Program

The NEB continued to refine its Aboriginal Engagement Program and began to use the term “Indigenous” as well as “Aboriginal” within the appropriate contexts. Indigenous Awareness at the NEB is used to promote and respect Indigenous people’s diverse culture, each unique perspective and contributions made to complement Canada’s rich history (past, present, future).

In response to the NEB’s growing need for experience with Indigenous peoples and culture, the Indigenous Awareness Week committee has expanded Indigenous Awareness into a year-long program of events. 

In partnership with other federal departments and industry in Calgary, the NEB continues to promote and encourage employees to participate in meetings and celebrations respecting diversity, as well as commemorative events and awareness training.

The NEB actively seeks to hire Aboriginal employees.

2.2 Persons with Disabilities

Our focus has been to promote an inclusive, healthy and productive work environment. Accommodation for Persons with Disabilities is provided to employees as required. Work schedules are adjusted to provide variable start times where circumstances warrant and modified work weeks are provided whenever feasible. Ergonomic assessments of individual work stations continue to be provided. Employees with disabilities who require measures to be implemented in order to accommodate their needs are given attention.

The Duty to Accommodate Policy, procedures and guidelines were updated in 2014-15 and training was provided within the organization. The intent is to ensure this policy provides for an inclusive, barrier-free, non-discriminatory workplace, allowing for the full participation of both its employees and selection process candidates. Duty to Accommodate training is facilitated by the Union and Human Resources twice a year and was recently added to the list of courses mandatory for leaders.

2.3 Other Initiatives

  • The NEB Employment Equity& Diversity Committee (EEDC), comprised of Management, PIPSC Union representation, Employment Equity Members (employees) and Human Resources was active. The Committee is responsible for monitoring the progress of the EEDP and for making recommendations to enhance the program.
  • EEDC continues to offer lunch and learns opportunities for employees to hear about other employees and their travels and/or their home countries. Employees volunteer to participate as presenters. Discussions included such topics as cultural differences, background, language, indigenous animals, landscape and everyday lifestyles. The sessions were well attended and feedback from presenters and participants continues to be extremely positive.
  • Consultations with employee representatives on Employment Equity initiatives took place within the mandate of the NEB Union-Management Consultation Committee.
  • An online orientation course that includes an Employment Equity component continues to be offered.
  • Telework Agreements are available to encourage employment equity groups to consider NEB as their Employer of Choice.
  • The services of an Ombudsperson were available to all employees to discuss and receive coaching on issues that are related to harassment and discrimination.
  • Each year, the NEB awards an individual or team who has continuously enhanced Employment Equity and diversity through behavior, actions or achievements.
  • An intake for the Emerging Leader Program for employees was launched this past year. The purpose of the NEB's Emerging Leaders Program is to develop future leaders at the NEB. Through this Program we allow individuals who have shown an interest in leadership and who have demonstrated management and leadership potential through concrete behaviors to receive support in their development and pursuit of leadership positions within the NEB. The Program is comprised of formal and experiential learning. A number of the participants have self-identified as being members of an employment equity group.

3.0 Workforce Analysis

3.1 Data Availability

Comparison data for this report comes from the 2011 Census Data for Calgary, with the exception of Persons with Disabilities where the source is the 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, which is based on national statistics.

The inclusion of Landed Immigrants in the statistical data can be misleading for government departments and agencies, such as the NEB, that are regulated by the Public Service Employment Act and the Security of Information Act. External systemic barriers and the inability to facilitate security clearances from the country of origin for Landed Immigrants create barriers to the employment of some visible minorities. Under the provisions of the Public Service Employment Act (PSEA), departments are required to provide Canadian Citizens with a preference for employment opportunities. Foreign educational documentation is not recognized and often difficult to verify, creating delays in potential employment for immigrants whose credentials do not meet Canadian standards, especially in hard to find skill sets such as specialty engineers.

3.2 Employee Population

The workforce analysis was conducted on the total employee population with the exception of those employees who work less than 12.5 hours/week. In addition, the following persons were not included in the NEB workforce analysis:

  • Governor-in-Council appointments: Chair/CEO, Vice-Chair, and Board Members;
  • Persons who were brought into the NEB on Interchange from other Federal Government departments/agencies and private industry;
  • Persons who worked for a period less than thirteen weeks; or
  • Students.

3.3 Self-Identification

The Self-Identification initiative continues to be a mandatory process for all employees. Mandatory information includes their name and signature; other information is voluntary.

Only those employees who voluntarily identify themselves as Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities or Persons with Disabilities are counted as members of designated groups for the purpose of conducting this workforce analysis and implementing Employment Equity. Women were also included but identified using information provided by My Government of Canada Human Resources system (My GCHR).

3.4 Analysis

Analysis of representation levels of designated groups within the NEB was conducted and conclusions appear before each table. It is important to note that, because of our small workforce, a change of one or two individuals within the designated group can change percentages dramatically.

To protect the privacy of employees, data is not shown if representation amounts to fewer than three employees with exception to men and women.

4.0 Analysis of Total Employee Population

Employment Equity representation is determined by comparing the representation within an occupational category with its workforce availability. To ensure confidentiality for employment equity groups (excluding Women & Table 1) this report will not indicate any numbers where representation is three (3) or less. Note: Tables also include number of men to ensure data is accurate.

An analysis of the total employee population was conducted; the results by gender and designated group members are shown in Table 1.

Table 1 shows that as of 31 March 2016, the total employee population was 489 employees, made up of 461 full-time and 28 part-time employees. Men comprised 37% of the total population, while Women had a representation of 62%, a slight increase from last year.

Table 1 also shows the percentage of representation by designated groups compared with the labour market availability data. From these comparisons, it can be seen that Women, Aboriginal People, and Persons with Disabilities are represented at a higher rate at the NEB than the overall labour market and that Visible Minorities show lower than availability.

The NEB workforce analysis shows these results:

Women: Exceeds workforce availability in this group by 15.9%.

Aboriginal: Slightly exceeds workforce availability in this group by 2.4%.

Visible Minorities: Data indicates a shortage in this group by -10.6%.

Persons with Disabilities: Data indicates a slight shortage in this group by -0.4%.

Table 1: Comparison of Total Employee Population with Availability Data as of 31 March 2015

Table 1: Comparison of Total Employee Population with Availability
Data as of 31 March 2015
Number of Employees Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities**
Full-Time 461 177 284 23 71 24
Part-Time 28 4 24 1 3 2
Total 489 181 308 24 74 26
NEB Representation 37% 63% 4.9% 15.1% 5.3%
2011 Census Availability Data* 52.9% 47.1% 2.5% 25.7% 4.9%
NEB’s differential
(over and under-represented)
-15.9% 15.9% 2.4% -10.6% 0.4%

5.0 Analysis by Employment Equity Occupational Groups

Table 2 shows the breakdown into Employment Equity occupational groups of the total employee population by gender and designated groups. For each occupational group, the representation by gender and designated group members is given in whole numbers, as well as a proportion of the total number of employees (the first percentage figure at the bottom of each cell). The Calgary labour market availability data is the percentage figure that follows. Where representation is fewer than three (with exception of Women), for confidentiality purposes, (*) is used to denote data.

5.1 Senior Managers

Table 2 shows that as of 31 March 2016, there were 11 senior managers employed at the NEB. Of these, five were women, which, at 45.5%, is higher than the overall Calgary labour market availability data of 22.3%. There is no representation of Aboriginal People or Visible Minorities in this group.

The occupational groups for Senior Managers and Middle Managers were combined for Persons with Disabilities. Total number of Person with Disabilities within this group is four, which, at 9.1%, is higher than the overall National labour market availability data of 4.3%.

5.2 Middle Managers

There was an increase from 28 to 33 middle managers (Directors) between 2015 and 2016; the representation of Women decreased from 57.2% to 48.5%. Visible Minorities and Persons with Disabilities were fewer than three therefore analysis is not shown. There is no representation of Aboriginal People in this group.

5.3 Professionals

The Professional group is comprised of financial officers, engineers, economists, environmental specialists, human resources advisors, communications advisors, information systems specialists, translators and lawyers. In this occupational group, Women were well represented compared with the availability data (57.7% vs. 49.9%) as were Aboriginal People (3.3% vs. 1.4%). Visible Minorities were under represented (15% vs. 24.8% availability) as were Persons with Disabilities (3.7% vs. 3.8% availability).

5.4 Semi-Professionals and Technicians

The Semi-Professionals and Technicians occupational group includes geological technologists, engineering inspectors, library technicians, information technology service analysts and graphic designers. Women are well represented in this group: Women (65.7% vs. 48.6%), as were Aboriginal People (9.0% vs 2.6) and Persons with Disabilities (11.9% vs 4.6%). Visible Minorities were under represented (11.9% vs 23.2%).

5.5 Supervisors

There are four employees in this occupational group and 100% are Women; no other representation is present in this group.

5.6 Administrative and Senior Clerical

Women made up the vast majority of the NEB’s complement in the Administrative and Senior Clerical occupational group, which includes Business Unit Administrators, Human Resources Assistants, and Assistants to Board Members and other senior level administrative staff. Women are well represented (84.1% vs 80.5%), and Aboriginal People (4.5% vs 2.6%) and Visible Minorities (22.7% vs 16.5%). Persons with Disabilities were fewer than three therefore analysis is not shown.

5.7 Skilled Crafts and Trades

The four Employment Equity groups are under-represented in this category.

5.8 Clerical Personnel

This category includes records, mail clerks and general administrative assistants. All equity groups were represented in this category; the table shows Women (81.4% vs. 70.2%), Aboriginal People (8.5% vs 3.0%), and Persons with Disabilities (8.5% vs 7%). Visible Minorities were almost reflecting availability (23.7% vs. 24.3%).

5.9 Semi-Skilled Workers

There are three employees within this occupational group, of which, three or less self-identified as members of the Aboriginal Employment Equity group therefore an analysis is not shown.

5.10 Summary

An analysis of occupational groups from an Employment Equity perspective demonstrates a commitment to Employment Equity, with opportunities for maintaining the level of excellence and increasing representation in some occupational groups for some categories. As per our EEDP, we are committed to ensuring our selection processes do not restrict participation of potential candidates.

Women were over-represented in most occupational groups with exception to Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers and Semi-Skilled Manual Workers. The majority of all Women employed at the NEB were found in the Professional (154), Administrative & Senior Clerical (37), andClerical Personnel (48).

Aboriginal People exceed the availability in the Professional group, Semi-Professionals, & Technicians, and Clerical Personnel occupational groups.

Visible Minorities exceed availability in the Professional group, are almost as par for Clerical Personnel and show an under-representation compared to workforce availability in all other occupational groups.

Persons with Disabilities exceed the availability in Professionals, Semi-Professionals & Technicians, and Clerical Personnel occupational groups. Other groups are not presented due to privacy.

In order to increase representation in specific occupational groups, greater opportunities for upward mobility may need to be provided through leadership development, formal learning and access to internal developmental opportunities and coaching.

Table 2: Comparison of Employee Population with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups as of 31 March 2016

Table 2: Comparison of Employee Population with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups as of 31 March 2016
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with DisabilitiesTable Note **
Senior Managers 11 6 5 0 0 Table Note **
NEB% : Census%   54.5% : 77.7% 45.5% : 22.3% 0% : 1.7% 0% : 10.4% Table Note *% : 4.3%
Middle Managers 33 17 16 0 Table Note * Table Note **
NEB% : Census%   51.5% : 62.6% 48.5% : 37.4% 0% : 1.7% Table Note *% : 19.1% Table Note *% : 4.3%
Professionals 267 113 154 9 40 10
NEB% : Census%   42.3% : 50.1% 57.7% : 49.9% 3.3% : 1.4% 15% : 24.8% 3.7% : 3.8%
Semi-Professionals & Technicians 67 23 44 6 8 8
NEB% : Census%   34.3% : 51.4% 65.7% : 48.6% 9% : 2.6% 11.9% : 23.2% 11.9% : 4.6%
Supervisors 4 0 4 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 45% 100% : 55% 0% : 3.1% 0% : 27.4% 0% : 13.9%
Administrative & Senior Clerical 44 7 37 Table Note * 10 Table Note *
NEB% : Census%   15.9% : 19.5% 84.1% : 80.5% Table Note *0 % : 2.6 % 22.7% : 16.5% Table Note *% : 3.4%
Skilled Crafts & Trades 1 1 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   100% : 95.9% 0% : 4.1% 0% : 4.2% 0% : 18.1% 0% : 3.8%
Clerical Personnel 59 11 48 5 14 5
NEB% : Census%   18.6% : 29.8% 81.4% : 70.2% 8.5% : 3.0% 23.7% : 24.3% 8.5% : 7.0%
Semi-Skilled Workers 3 3 0 Table Note * 0 0
NEB% : Census%   100% : 85.5% 0% : 14.5% Table Note *% : 3.5% 0% : 33.1% 0% : 4.8%
Totals*** 489 181 308 24 74 26

Due to the NEB’s conversion earlier this year from HRIS to MyGCHR, all data presented in this report is based on a combination of information from both prior and current systems along with input from the HR Services team. We believe it to be the most accurate information that can be presented at this time.

6.0 Analysis of the Numbers of Employee Hires, Promotions and Regrettable Departures

Tables 3, 4 and 5 summarize new employee hires, promotions and regrettable departure activity between 01 April 2015 and 31 March 2016.

6.1 Employee Hires

Table 3 reports 44 employees were hired. Of those, 28 (63.6%) were Women, and 8 (18.2%) were Visible Minorities. Fewer than three persons from the Aboriginal or Persons with Disabilities group(s) were hired.

6.2 Employee Promotions

Table 4 shows that 56 employees were promoted during this period, down from 68 last year. The majority of promotions were in the Women’s group (33) and seven in the Visibility Minorities group. Fewer than three employees in both the Aboriginal and Persons with Disabilities were promoted.

6.3 Employee Regrettable Departures

Table 5 reports that in this period, 14 employees left the NEB, of these 9 were Women.

6.4 Summary

Analysis of hires, promotions and regrettable departures suggests that Women accounted for the greatest staff movements into, within, and out of the NEB.

Visible Minorities accounted for 18.2% of new hires and 12.5% of promotions.

Table 3: Comparison of Employee Hires with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016

Table 3: Comparison of Employee Hires with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups
1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities**
Senior Managers 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 77.7% 0% : 22.3% 0% : 1.7% 0% : 10.4% 0% : 4.3%
Middle Managers 2 1 1 0 0 Table Note *
NEB% : Census%   50% : 62.6% 50% : 37.4% 0% : 1.7% 0% : 19.1% Table Note *0% : 4.3%
Professionals 23 12 11 0 4 Table Note *
NEB% : Census%   52.2% : 50.1% 47.8% : 49.9% % : 1.4% 17.4% : 24.8% Table Note *% : 3.8%
Semi-Professionals & Technicians 4 1 3 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   34.3% : 51.4% 65.7% : 48.6% 0% : 2.6% 0% : 23.2% 0%: 4.6%
Supervisors 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 45% 100% : 55% 0% : 3.1% 0% : 27.4% 0% : 13.9%
Administrative & Senior Clerical 6 0 6 Table Note * Table Note * 0
NEB% : Census%   15.9% : 19.5% 84.1% : 80.5% Table Note *% : 2.6% Table Note *% : 16.5% 0% : 3.4%
Skilled Crafts & Trades 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 95.9% 0% : 4.1% 0% : 4.2% 0% : 18.1% 0% : 3.8%
Clerical Personnel 8 1 7 0 Table Note * 0
NEB% : Census%   12.5% : 29.8% 87.5% : 70.2% 0% : 3.0% Table Note *% : 24.3% 0% : 7.0%
Semi-Skilled Workers 1 1 0 Table Note * 0 0
NEB% : Census%   100% : 85.5% 0% : 14.5% 0% : 3.5% 0% : 33.1% 0% : 4.8%
Totals 44 16 28 Table Note * 4 Table Note *

Due to the NEB’s conversion earlier this year from HRIS to MyGCHR, all data presented in this report is based on a combination of information from both prior and current systems along with input from the HR Services team. We believe it to be the most accurate information that can be presented at this time.

Table 4: Employee Promotions by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational GroupsTable Note * 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016

Table 4: Employee Promotions by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups
1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Senior Managers 1 0 1 0 0 0
Middle & Other Managers 3 2 1 0 Table Note * 0
Professionals 43 20 23 Table Note * 6 Table Note *
Semi-Professionals and Technicians 2 1 1 0 0 0
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel 6 0 6 Table Note * 0 0
Clerical Personnel 1 0 1 0 0 0
Totals 56 23 33 Table Note * 7 Table Note *

Due to the NEB’s conversion earlier this year from HRIS to MyGCHR, all data presented in this report is based on a combination of information from both prior and current systems along with input from the HR Services team. We believe it to be the most accurate information that can be presented at this time.

Table 5: Employee Regrettable Departures by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016

Table 5: Employee Regrettable Departures by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups
1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Senior & Middle Managers Table Note * Table Note * 0 0 0 0
Professionals 12 7 5 Table Note * Table Note * 0
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel Table Note * Table Note * Table Note * 0 0 Table Note *
Clerical Personnel 7 0 7 0 0 Table Note *
Totals 24 9 15 Table Note * Table Note * Table Note *

Due to the NEB’s conversion earlier this year from HRIS to MyGCHR, all data presented in this report is based on a combination of information from both prior and current systems along with input from the HR Services team. We believe it to be the most accurate information that can be presented at this time.

Table 6: Workforce Availability – Women
Date: 2016-03-31

Table 6 Workforce Availability – Women
Date: 2016-03-31
Employment Equity Occupational Group All
Employees
#
Representation Availability Gap
# % % # #
01: Senior Managers 11 5 45.5% 22.2% 2 +3
02: Middle and Other Managers 33 16 48.5% 37.4% 10 +6
03: Professionals 293 174 59.4% 49.9% 135 +39
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 41 24 58.5% 48.6% 17 +7
05: Supervisors 4 4 100.0% 55.0% 2 +2
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 44 37 84.1% 80.5% 53 +4
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0% 4.1% 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 58 47 81.0% 70.2% 15 +32
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 3 0 0.0% 14.5% 0 0
Total 489 307 234 +93

Due to the NEB’s conversion earlier this year from HRIS to MyGCHR, all data presented in this report is based on a combination of information from both prior and current systems along with input from the HR Services team. We believe it to be the most accurate information that can be presented at this time.

Table 7: Workforce Availability – Aboriginal Peoples
Date: 2016-03-31

Table 7 Workforce Availability – Aboriginal Peoples
Date: 2016-03-31
Employment Equity Occupational Group All
Employees
#
Representation Availability Gap
# % % # #
01: Senior Managers 11 0 0.0% 1.7% 0 0
02: Middle and Other Managers 33 0 0.0% 1.7% 0 0
03: Professionals 293 9 3.1% 1.4% 4 +5
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 41 6 14.6% 2.6% 1 +5
05: Supervisors 4 0 0.0% 3.1% 0 0
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 44 Table Note * Table Note *% 2.6% 2 Table Note *
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0% 4.2% 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 58 5 8.6% 3.0% 1 +4
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 3 Table Note * Table Note *% 3.5% 0 Table Note *
Total 489 24 8 16

Due to the NEB’s conversion earlier this year from HRIS to MyGCHR, all data presented in this report is based on a combination of information from both prior and current systems along with input from the HR Services team. We believe it to be the most accurate information that can be presented at this time.

Table 8: Workforce Availability – Visible Minorities
Date: 2016-03-31

Table 8 Workforce Availability – Visible Minorities
Date: 2016-03-31
Employment Equity Occupational Group All Employees Representation Availability Gap
# # % % # #
01: Senior Managers 11 0 0.0% 10.4% 1 -1
02: Middle and Other Managers 33 Table Note * Table Note *% 19.1% 5 Table Note *
03: Professionals 293 40 13.7% 24.8% 67 -27
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 41 8 19.5% 23.2% 8 0
05: Supervisors 4 0 0.0% 27.4% 1 -1
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 44 10 22.7% 16.5% 11 -10
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0% 18.1% 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 58 14 24.1% 24.3% 5 +9
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 3 0 0.0% 33.1% 1 -1
Total 489 72 99 -31

Due to the NEB’s conversion earlier this year from HRIS to MyGCHR, all data presented in this report is based on a combination of information from both prior and current systems along with input from the HR Services team. We believe it to be the most accurate information that can be presented at this time.

Table 9: Workforce Availability – Persons with Disabilities
Date: 2016-03-31

Table 9 Workforce Availability – Persons with Disabilities
Date: 2016-03-31
Employment Equity Occupational Group All
Employees
Representation Availability Gap
# # % % # #
01/02: Managers 44 4 9.1% 4.3% 2 +2
03: Professionals 293 10 3.4% 3.8% 10 0
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 41 6 14.6% 4.6% 2 +4
05: Supervisors 4 0 Table Note *% 13.9% 0 0
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 44 Table Note * Table Note *% 3.4% 2 Table Note *
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0% 3.8% 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 58 4 8.6% 7.0% 1 +3
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 3 0 0.0% 4.8% 0 0
Total 489 25 17 +8

Due to the NEB’s conversion earlier this year from HRIS to MyGCHR, all data presented in this report is based on a combination of information from both prior and current systems along with input from the HR Services team. We believe it to be the most accurate information that can be presented at this time.

Chart 1 – Employment Equity Representation Women from 2013 to 2016

Chart*nbsp;1 – Employment Equity Representation Women from 2013 to 2016

Chart 2 – Employment Equity Representation Aboriginal from 2013 to 2016

Chart 2 – Employment Equity Representation Aboriginal from 2013 to 2016

Chart 3 – Employment Equity Representation Visible Minorities from 2013 to 2016

Chart 3 – Employment Equity Representation Visible Minorities from 2013 to 2016

Chart 4 – Employment Equity Representation Persons with Disabilities from 2013 to 2016

Chart 4 – Employment Equity Representation Persons with Disabilities from 2013 to 2016

7.0 Conclusion

The NEB workforce exceeds representation in three groups: Women, Aboriginal People, and Person with Disabilities. There is an under-representation within the Visible Minorities group. As the NEB has a small workforce, a change of one or two individuals can make a significant impact to the statistics.

The NEB remains committed to promoting diversity within the workforce and improving our representation in the various groups. We continue to take into consideration Employment Equity needs in most staffing actions. This is completed in the posting of the job opportunity and is included in the organizational needs by indicating “The NEB is committed to having a skilled and diversified workforce representative of the population we serve. In support of our strategy to achieve our employment equity goals, selection may be limited to candidates self-identifying as belonging to one of the following Employment Equity groups: Women, Aboriginal Persons, Visible Minorities and Persons with Disability.” The Public Service Commission template for posting job opportunities also promotes Employment Equity and encourages candidates to indicate voluntarily on their application if they are a member of one of the four groups.

As part of our attraction and retention strategy for all employees, the NEB is committed to building a workplace that embraces inclusiveness and diversity. As documented in the NEB People Strategy, retention is an integrated approach to human resources management. Our Talent Management Framework is designed to support the development of all our employees. The NEB continues to improve our outreach efforts to increase the representation of Visible Minorities. This is accomplished through the job posting as noted above. Although the NEB’s representation of Aboriginal People reflects well against the availability data, we will continue to network with representatives of both secondary and post-secondary institutions that have responsibility for Aboriginal learners and liaise with Workforce Diversity Consultants in other government organizations to share inventories of available Aboriginal applicants.

Labour market availability for the Visible Minority group has increased with the inclusion of Landed Immigrants in Census data. This adjustment represents an increase in the representation target for the NEB. However as a federal employer preference must be given to Canadians.

We continue to build on our three year EEDP as the initiatives grow and evolve.

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