On Wednesday, August 28, 2019, the National Energy Board (NEB) became the Canada Energy Regulator (CER). For further information please visit our Implementing the Canadian Energy Regulator Act information page

Safety performance dashboard

Companies must report events, such as incidents and unauthorized activities, to the CER in accordance with the CER Event Reporting Guidelines. Knowing what happened, and why, helps us find ways to prevent them from happening again.

Search the dashboard

Scroll right and left using the arrows next to the description at the top of the dashboard to search through the data. Customize what you see by selecting a certain company, year, place, or type of event.

The dashboard shows:

  • number of events
  • type of events
  • how many caused harm
  • causes (i.e., what happened and why it happened)
  • violator type
  • location of events

We keep information we have released from previous years. Check out past updates to the dashboard. A number of terms we use in our illustrations and graphics are well used in industry and have specific meanings. Learn more in our glossary.

Descriptions
  1. This chart shows the total number of events reported by companies each year. The CER uses these numbers to externally report the number of incidents and unauthorized activities. However, each incident or unauthorized activity may have one or more event types. For example, one incident could involve a fire and a spill. The bars show the number of events reported with multiple types versus the number where only a single type was reported. Use the filters to choose the events and companies you are interested in. Use the arrows to the left and right to navigate through the dashboards.
  2. This graph shows the types of events reported to the CER. A single event may have more than one type. For example, one incident could involve a fire and a spill and show up as two event types on this graph. As a result of this double counting, the number of events on this graph would add up to a higher number than the total number of events you saw on a previous graph. Use the filters to choose the events, event types, and companies you are interested in. If you are looking at “release of substance” type of events you can also choose to show the volume released.
  3. Most incidents do not harm people or the environment but the CER needs to know about all incidents. This chart shows incidents that posed, or may have posed, a higher risk of harm to people or the environment. The pie graphs show the percentage of incidents each year which were classified in this category. The bar graphs show the number and type of incidents each year that harmed, or may have harmed, people and the environment. Use the filter to choose the companies you are interested in.
  4. What happened? This graph shows the circumstances that directly led to each incident. Companies usually provide cause data to the CER within 12 weeks after an incident is reported. Incidents cannot be included on this graph until the cause data is submitted. The causes are grouped into 6 high-level categories which are explained in the glossary. See the link near the top of the page. Use the filters to choose the types, years, causes, and companies you are interested in. You can choose to view data back to 2008.
  5. Why did it happen? This graph shows the underlying reasons for the incident in 10 high-level categories. Companies are required by regulation to identify the causes and implement corrective/preventative actions. They must submit that data to the CER. Technical staff reviews it to ensure the causes and actions identified are appropriate. In many cases the CER sends information requests which ask the companies additional questions. Use the filters to choose the types, years, causes and companies you are interested in. You can choose to view data back to 2008.
  6. This graph shows the type of violator that committed each unauthorized activity. In a sense, these activities are “near-misses” that were not authorized by the pipeline company and occurred close enough to the pipeline that damage could have occurred. In some cases the company is not able to identify the violator so it is listed as unknown. Companies usually provide violator data to the CER within 30 days after an unauthorized activity is reported. Unauthorized activities are not included on this graph until the violator data is submitted. Prior to 2010 the CER collected information differently, so data for 2008 and 2009 cannot be shown using these categories. Use the filters to choose the violator types and companies you are interested in.
  7. This map shows the number of events reported in each province from 2008 to 2018. Broadly speaking, the CER finds that more incidents occur in provinces with a higher number of pipelines. However, this is not a direct or simple relationship. The CER is working on providing normalized incident data to better show this relationship. Use the filters to choose the events, types, years, and companies you are interested in.

Compliance and enforcement

We check to make sure companies are meeting our requirements, from when a company first applies to when a project ends. This may mean us asking for more information or doing an inspection or an audit. For companies that aren’t meeting our standards and requirements, we take steps to enforce them and bring the company back into compliance.

Let us know what you think

We welcome feedback on how we share information about events reported to the CER. If you’re having trouble with the dashboard or have an idea about something else you would like to see, we want to know about it.

Email us

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