Employment Equity Report 2016–2017

Employment Equity Report 2016–2017 [PDF 526 KB]

ISSN 1929-2511

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction

  1. 1.1 The Organization
  2. 1.2 1.2 Analysis

2.0 Employment Equity Initiatives

  1. 2.1 Aboriginal Engagement Program
  2. 2.2 Persons with Disabilities
  3. 2.3 Other Initiatives

3. 0 Workforce Analysis

  1. 3.1 Data Availability
  2. 3.2 Employee Population
  3. 3.3 Self-Identification
  4. 3.4 Analysis

4.0 Analysis of Total Employee Population

5.0 Analysis by Employment Equity Occupational Groups

  1. 5.1 Senior Managers
  2. 5.2 Middle Managers
  3. 5.3 Professionals
  4. 5.4 Semi-Professionals and Technicians
  5. 5.5 Supervisors
  6. 5.6 Administrative and Senior Clerical
  7. 5.7 Skilled Crafts and Trades
  8. 5.8 Clerical Personnel
  9. 5.9 Semi-Skilled Workers
  10. 5.10 Summary of Analysis

6.0 Analysis of the Numbers of Employee Hires, Promotions and Regrettable Departures

  1. 6.1 Employee Hires
  2. 6.2 Employee Promotions
  3. 6.3 Employee Regrettable Departures
  4. 6.4 Summary

7.0 Conclusion

List of Tables

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1.0 Introduction

The National Energy Board (NEB) is committed to providing an inclusive workplace and to ensuring legislative requirements of the Public Service Employment Act and the Employment Equity Act are adhered to accordingly.

Employment Equity looks at the following groups when determining adherence to or potential gaps in a workforce: [1] Women, [2] Aboriginal People, [3] Visible Minorities and [4] Persons with Disabilities.

NEB’s annual Employment Equity report provides an analysis of the results achieved during the reporting period from 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017. In addition, the report provides a workforce description of the employees at the NEB as of 31 March 2017, this includes an analysis of internal representation in comparison to labour market availability.

1.1 The Organization

The NEB regulates pipelines, energy development and trade in the public interest with safety as our primary concern. Specifically, we regulate interprovincial and international pipelines, which if laid end-to-end would wrap around the earth nearly two times. We also regulate international and designated power lines, imports of natural gas and exports of crude oil and natural gas liquids. Finally, we are charged with providing information and advice on Canadian and global energy issues.

Our work touches the lives of Canadians every day and affects what matters to them: their lands, water, environment, jobs, communities, safety, and wellbeing. The energy infrastructure we oversee also contributes to Canada’s economic wellbeing and facilitates efficient energy markets. Of note, approximately $100 billion worth of petroleum products and electricity were transported by this infrastructure to Canadians and the world this past year alone.

The NEB is a lifecycle regulator. We oversee the safety and environmental protection of a pipeline project from the application assessment phase, through to construction and operation. In 2016, the Pipeline Safety Act came into effect. As a result we now oversee pipelines even after they are no longer in operation to make sure they remain safe.

We are a team of eight Board Members, 11 Temporary Members and 490 staff. Our responsibility to Canadians is set out in various laws, regulations and government policies. Each member of the NEB team has a different role to play. In addition to their major role in reviewing project applications and making regulatory decisions, Board Members also provide strategic oversight for the NEB’s operations.

1.2 1.2 Analysis

Data analysis was performed utilizing data from the 2011 Census Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) report to compare overall representation of three of the four designated groups at the NEB (Women, Aboriginal People, and Visible Minorities) within the local Calgary labour market. The fourth designated group, Persons with Disabilities, the workforce availability data is at the national level. Notes: (a) In previous years the NEB has used national data for all groups; utilizing Calgary data provides a more relevant comparison. (b) As per census data available, the workforce population is aged 15 years and older. (c) Although 2016 census data has been published, Treasury Board Secretariat confirmed the use 2011 census data.

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2.0 Employment Equity Initiatives

Given the NEB’s unique role with respect the Canada’s energy industry, one of the greatest challenges is to attract and qualified staff. The NEB Employment Equity and Diversity Plan (EEDP) recognizes we must embrace and represent diversity to enable us to achieve service excellence through our employees. The NEB is committed to strengthening and continuously improving its diversity reach an as it is integral to supporting a balance internal population that truly reflects Canadian diversity.

2.1 Aboriginal Engagement Program

The NEB continues to refine its Aboriginal Engagement Program now referred to as the Indigenous Engagement Program within the appropriate contexts. Indigenous Awareness at the NEB is used to promote and respect Indigenous peoples’ diverse cultures, unique perspectives and contributions made to complement Canada’s rich past, present and future.

In response to the NEB’s growing need for engagement with Indigenous peoples and knowledge of their cultures, the Indigenous Awareness Week committee continues to sponsor events all year long.

In partnership with other federal departments and industry in Calgary, the NEB promotes and encourages employees to participate in meetings and celebrations respecting diversity, as well as commemorative events and awareness training.

The NEB actively seeks to hire Indigenous employees through targeted staffing actions. Our most recent initiative, in coordination with our Indigenous Awareness Management Committee (IAMC), was the targeted recruitment of Indigenous professional staff to support our Environmental and Engagement teams.

2.2 Persons with Disabilities

NEB focused on promoting an inclusive, healthy and productive work environment. This has included work schedules adjustments to provide variable start and stop times where circumstances warrant and modified work weeks. Ergonomic assessments of individual work stations continue to be provided. Additionally, NEB ensures workplace accommodation is offered to employees as required, up to the point of ensuring there is no undue hardship to the employer.

The Duty to Accommodate policy, procedures and guidelines are reviewed annually. The intent is to ensure that there is clear direction provided to support inclusive, barrier-free, non-discriminatory workplace. Duty to Accommodate training is facilitated in collaboration with the Union and Human Resources and is a mandatory course for leaders.

2.3 Other Initiatives

  • The NEB Employment Equity & Diversity Committee (EEDC) was very active throughout the last fiscal year. The EEDC is widely represented, comprised of management, Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC), Employment Equity Members (employees) and Human Resources. It is responsible for monitoring the progress of the Employment Equity & Diversity Plan (EEDP) and for making recommendations to enhance the program.
  • EEDC continues to offer lunch and learns opportunities for employees to hear about the diverse experiences of other employees who volunteer to participate as presenters. Discussions included such topics as cultural differences, mental and physical health awareness, diverse backgrounds, languages, animals of particular significance in Indigenous cultures, landscapes and everyday lifestyles. The sessions were well attended and feedback from presenters and participants continues to be extremely positive.
  • Consultations with employee representatives on employment equity initiatives took place within the mandate of the NEB Union-Management Consultation Committee (UMCC).
  • An online orientation course that includes an Employment Equity component continues to be offered.
  • Telework Agreements are available as an option for consideration to encourage employment equity groups to seek out the NEB as their employer of choice.
  • The services of a third party Ombudsperson Office is available to all employees to discuss their concerns and provide an opportunity to receive personal coaching on difficult issues.
  • Each year, the NEB awards an individual or team who has continuously enhanced employment equity and diversity through behavior, actions or achievements.
  • The Leadership Development Program at the NEB supports the development of competencies for emerging, existing and seasoned leaders. It enables the exploration and learning the key areas of management and leadership through formal and informal training.  The program assists in identifying potential leaders as well as tracks the progress of individuals who are already in leadership roles. The goal of the program is to ensure that the NEB has a sufficient pool of leaders to deliver on its mandate and to ensure there is consistency of learning and leadership practices among in the organization. A number of the participants have self-identified as being members of an employment equity group.
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3.0 Workforce Analysis

3.1 Data Availability

Comparison data for this report comes from the 2011 Census workforce availability data for Calgary, with the exception of Persons with Disabilities which utilizes the 2011 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey based on national statistics.

It is noted that Landed Immigrants are included in the statistical data, however external systemic barriers for hiring can be misleading for government departments and agencies, such as the NEB, that are regulated by the Public Service Employment Act (PSEA) and the Security of Information Act. Under the provisions of the PSEA, departments are required to provide Canadian Citizens with a preference for employment opportunities. However, external systemic barriers may exist in regard to hiring Landed Immigrants. These include the inability to expedite security clearances from many Landed Immigrants’ countries, and the candidates’ requirement to go through a lengthy process to get their foreign educational documentation officially verified to Canadian standards. These barriers hinder our ability to hire Landed Immigrants, many of whom we have found to be excellent candidates for hard to find technical skill sets such as specialty engineers.

3.2 Employee Population

The workforce analysis was conducted on the total employee population with the exception of individuals who work less than 12.5 hours/week. In addition, the following persons were not included in the NEB workforce analysis:

  • Governor-in-Council appointments: Chair/CEO, Vice-Chair, and Board Members;
  • Persons who are at the NEB on Interchange from other Federal Government departments/agencies and private industry;
  • Persons who worked for a period less than thirteen weeks;
  • Students;
  • Casuals; and
  • Contractors.

3.3 Self-Identification

MyGCHR is the Government of Canada’s new standardized Human Resources (HR) management system in use by a large percentage of Federal Departments and Agencies. It is a consolidated automated information system for all HR administrative transactions, including self-service for employees and managers.

With the arrival of MyGCHR at the NEB in March 2016, employees have the option to volunteer to self-identify when they log in to the system for the first time. Only those employees who voluntarily identify as Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities or Persons with Disabilities are captured as members of designated groups for the purpose of conducting the workforce analysis. Women were also included but identified using the gender information provided by employees via their hiring documents which are entered into MyGCHR by the HR Department.

3.4 Analysis

An analysis of representation levels of designated groups within the NEB was conducted and conclusions appear before each table. It is important to note that, due to our relatively small workforce, a change of one or two individuals within a designated group can change percentages dramatically.

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4.0 Analysis of Total Employee Population

Employment equity representation is determined by comparing the representation within an occupational category with its workforce availability. To ensure confidentiality for employment equity groups (excluding women & table 1) this report will not indicate any numbers where representation is three (3) or less. Note: Tables also include the number of men to ensure data is accurate.

An analysis of the total employee population was conducted; the results by gender and designated group members are shown in table 1.

Table 1 shows that as of 31 March 2017, the total employee population was 490 employees, made up of 467 full-time and 23 part-time employees. Men comprised 36.9% of the total population, while women had a representation of 63.1%, a slight increase from last year as shown in chart 1.

Table 1 also shows the percentage of representation by designated groups compared with the labour market availability data. From these comparisons, it can be seen that women, aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities are represented at a higher rate at the NEB than the overall labour market and that visible minorities show lower than availability.

Note that the comparisons throughout this report are percentage point differentials. For example, if NEB representation in a group is 40% and workforce availability is 20%, then the comparison is that the NEB is 20% (20 percentage points) higher than availability.

Specifically, the NEB workforce analysis shows these results:

Women: Exceeds workforce availability in this group by 16.0%.

Aboriginal: Exceeds workforce availability in this group by 2.0%.

Visible Minorities: Falls short of workforce availability in this group by -10.2%.

Persons with Disabilities: Exceeds workforce availability in this group by 0.4%.

Table 1: Comparison of Total Employee Population with Availability Data as of 31 March 2017

Table 1: Comparison of Total Employee Population with Availability
Data as of 31 March 2017
Number of Employees Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities**
Full-Time 467 178 289 20 74 22
Part-Time 23 3 20 2 2 4
Total 490 181 309 22 76 26
NEB Representation 36.9% 63.1% 4.5% 15.5% 5.3%
2011 Census Availability Data* 52.9% 47.1% 2.5% 25.7% 4.9%
NEB’s differential
(over and under-represented)
-16.0% 16.0% 2.0% -10.2% 0.4%
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5.0 Analysis by Employment Equity Occupational Groups

Table 2 shows the breakdown into employment equity occupational groups of the total employee population by gender and designated groups. For each occupational group, the representation by gender and designated group members is given in whole numbers, as well as a proportion of the total number of employees (the first percentage figure at the bottom of each cell). The Calgary labour market availability data is the percentage figure that follows. Where representation is three or fewer (with exception of women), for confidentiality purposes, (*) is used to denote that data exists but is not reported. Data collected for persons with disabilities combines senior managers and middle managers categories and (**) is used to denote that data exists but is not reported.

5.1 Senior Managers

Table 2 shows that as of 31 March 2017, there were 14 senior managers employed at the NEB. Eight were women, which at 57.1%, is higher than the overall Calgary labour market availability data of 22.3%. There is no representation of aboriginal people in this group. The occupational groups for senior managers and middle managers were combined for persons with disabilities. Total number of persons with disabilities within these groups is four, which at 8.6%, is higher than the overall national labour market availability data of 4.3%.

5.2 Middle Managers

The number of middle managers (32) remained the same as the previous year. Women decreased from 48.5% to 40.6% and visible minorities increased to 12.5% which is higher than previous years. There is no representation of aboriginal people in this group.

5.3 Professionals

The professionals group is comprised of financial officers, engineers, economists, environmental specialists, human resources advisors, communications advisors, information systems specialists, translators and lawyers. In this occupational group, women were well represented compared with the availability data (60.4% vs 49.9%) as were aboriginal people (3.5% vs 1.4%). Visible minorities were under represented (15.3% vs 24.8% availability) and persons with disabilities were well represented (4.2% vs 3.8% availability).

5.4 Semi-Professionals and Technicians

The semi-professionals and technicians occupational group includes engineering inspectors, library technicians, information technology service analysts and graphic designers. Women are well represented in this group (54.6% vs 48.6%), as were persons with disabilities (5.4% vs 4.6%). Aboriginal people and visible minorities were both under represented.

5.5 Supervisors

There are four employees in this occupational group and 100% are women; no other representation is present in this group.

5.6 Administrative and Senior Clerical

Women made up the majority of the NEB’s complement in the administrative and senior clerical occupational group, which includes business unit administrators, human resources assistants, and assistants to board members and other senior level administrative staff. Women are well represented (84.9% vs 80.5%), as are visible minorities (20.8% vs 16.5%). Aboriginal people and persons with disabilities were fewer than three therefore analysis is not shown.

5.7 Skilled Crafts and Trades

There was only one employee in this category and all equity groups were under-represented.

5.8 Clerical Personnel

This category includes records, mail clerks and general administrative assistants. All employment equity groups were well represented in this category; the table shows women (80.4 % vs 70.2%), aboriginal people (7.8% vs 3.0%), visible minorities (25.5% vs 24.3%) and persons with disabilities (7.8% vs 7.0%).

5.9 Semi-Skilled Workers

There are three employees within this occupational group, of which, three or less self-identified as members of the aboriginal employment equity group therefore specific data is not reported.

5.10 Summary of Analysis

An analysis of occupational groups from an employment equity perspective demonstrates a commitment to employment equity, with opportunities for increasing representation in the senior management occupational groups for some categories, and maintaining or improving in occupational groups that are well represented already. As per our EEDP, we are committed to ensuring our internal selection processes do not restrict participation of potential candidates.

Women were highly represented in most occupational groups. The 309 women employed at the NEB were primarily found in the following occupational groups: professionals (174 or 56%), administrative and senior clerical (53 or 17%), and clerical personnel (51 or 17%).

Aboriginal people exceeded the availability percentages in the professionals, and clerical personnel occupational groups.

Visible minorities exceeded availability in the administrative and senior clerical, and clerical personnel. This group shows an under-representation compared to workforce availability in all other occupational groups, and is an area for future focus.

Persons with disabilities exceed the availability in senior managers and middle managers, professionals, semi-professionals and technicians, and clerical personnel occupational groups.

In order to increase representation in specific occupational groups, targeted staffing where gaps currently exist is recommended, and opportunities for upward mobility should be provided through targeted leadership development, formal learning and access to internal developmental opportunities.

Table 2: Comparison of Employee Population with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups as of 31 March 2017

Table 2: Comparison of Employee Population with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups as of 31 March 2017
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with DisabilitiesTable Note **
Senior Managers 11 6 8 0 Table Note * 4Table Note **
NEB% : Census%   42.9% : 77.7% 57.1% : 22.3% 0% : 1.7% Table Note *% : 10.4% 8.6% : 4.3%
Middle Managers 32 19 13 0 4 Table Note **
NEB% : Census%   59.4% : 62.6% 40.6% : 37.4% 0% : 1.7% 12.5% : 19.1% Table Note **% : 4.3%
Professionals 288 114 174 10 44 12
NEB% : Census%   39.6% : 50.1% 60.4% : 49.9% 3.5% : 1.4% 15.3% : 24.8% 4.2% : 3.8%
Semi-Professionals & Technicians 44 20 24 Table Note * Table Note * 4
NEB% : Census%   45.4% : 51.4% 54.6% : 48.6% Table Note *% : 2.6% Table Note *% : 23.2% 5.4% : 4.6%
Supervisors 4 0 4 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 45% 100% : 55% 0% : 3.1% 0% : 27.4% 0% : 13.9%
Administrative & Senior Clerical 53 8 45 Table Note * 11 Table Note *
NEB% : Census%   15.1% : 19.5% 84.9% : 80.5% Table Note *% : 2.6 % 20.8% : 23.2% Table Note *% : 3.4%
Skilled Crafts & Trades 1 1 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   100% : 95.9% 0% : 4.1% 0% : 4.2% 0% : 18.1% 0% : 3.8%
Clerical Personnel 51 10 41 4 13 4
NEB% : Census%   19.6% : 29.8% 80.4% : 70.2% 7.8% : 3.0% 25.5% : 24.3% 7.8% : 7.0%
Semi-Skilled Workers 3 3 0 Table Note * 0 0
NEB% : Census%   100% : 85.5% 0% : 14.5% Table Note *% : 3.5% 0% : 33.1% 0% : 4.8%
Totals*** 490 181 309 22 76 26
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6.0 Analysis of the Numbers of Employee Hires, Promotions and Regrettable Departures

Tables 3, 4 and 5 summarize new employee hires, promotions and regrettable departure activity between 01 April 2016 and 31 March 2017.

6.1 Employee Hires

Table 3 reports 34 employees were hired. Of those, 21 (61.8%) were women, and 7 (20.6%) were visible minorities. Fewer than three persons from the persons with disabilities group(s) were hired. No aboriginal persons were hired.

6.2 Employee Promotions

Table 4 shows that 56 employees were promoted during this period, the same as last year. The majority of promotions were in the women’s group (33) and five in the visible minorities group. Fewer than three employees in the persons with disabilities group were promoted. No aboriginal persons were promoted.

6.3 Employee Regrettable Departures

Table 5 reports that in this period, 33 employees left the NEB, of these 22 were women. In the administrative and senior clerical personnel category, there were 3 or fewer incidents of visible minorities who departed the NEB hence the specific numbers are not reported.

6.4 Summary

Analysis of hires, promotions and regrettable departures suggests that women accounted for the greatest staff movements into, within, and out of the NEB.

7.0 Conclusion

The NEB’s overall workforce exceeds representation in three groups: women, aboriginal people, and person with disabilities. There is an under-representation within the visible minorities group.

The NEB remains committed to promoting diversity within the workforce and improving our representation in the various groups. We continue to take into consideration employment equity needs in staffing actions. This is conducted through posting ensuring the following statement is included “the NEB is committed to having a skilled and diversified workforce representative of the population we serve. In support of our strategy to achieve our employment equity goals, selection may be limited to candidates self-identifying as belonging to one of the following employment equity groups: women, aboriginal persons, visible minorities and persons with disability.” The Public Service Commission template for posting job opportunities also promotes employment equity and encourages candidates to indicate voluntarily on their application if they are a member of one of the four groups.

As part of our attraction and retention strategy for all employees, the NEB is committed to building a workplace that embraces inclusiveness and diversity. Our Talent Management Framework is designed to support the development of all our employees. The NEB continues to improve our outreach efforts to increase the representation of visible minorities. This is accomplished through job postings as noted above.

Labour market availability data for the visible minority group has increased with the inclusion of Landed Immigrants in Census data. This adjustment represents an increase in the representation target for the NEB. However, as a Federal employer, preference must be given to Canadians.

Table 3: Comparison of Employee Hires with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017

Table 3: Comparison of Employee Hires with Availability Data by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups
1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities**
Senior Managers 4 1 3 0 Table Note * 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 77.7% 0% : 22.3% 0% : 1.7% Table Note *% : 10.4% 0% : 4.3%
Middle Managers 2 1 1 0 0 Table Note *
NEB% : Census%   50% : 62.6% 50% : 37.4% 0% : 1.7% 0% : 19.1% Table Note *% : 4.3%
Professionals 14 6 8 0 Table Note * 0
NEB% : Census%   46.7% : 50.1% 53.3% : 49.9% 0% : 1.4% Table Note *% : 24.8% 0% : 3.8%
Semi-Professionals & Technicians 1 1 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   100% : 51.4% 0% : 48.6% 0% : 2.6% 0% : 23.2% 0%: 4.6%
Supervisors 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 45% 0% : 55% 0% : 3.1% 0% : 27.4% 0% : 13.9%
Administrative & Senior Clerical 8 1 7 0 Table Note * 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 19.5% 100% : 80.5% 0% : 2.6% Table Note *% : 16.5% 0% : 3.4%
Skilled Crafts & Trades 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 95.9% 0% : 4.1% 0% : 4.2% 0% : 18.1% 0% : 3.8%
Clerical Personnel 5 3 2 0 Table Note * 0
NEB% : Census%   60% : 29.8% 40% : 70.2% 0% : 3.0% Table Note *% : 24.3% 0% : 7.0%
Semi-Skilled Workers 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEB% : Census%   0% : 85.5% 0% : 14.5% 0% : 3.5% 0% : 33.1% 0% : 4.8%
Totals 34 13 21 0 7 Table Note *

Table 4: Employee Promotions by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational GroupsTable Note * 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017

Table 4: Employee Promotions by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups
1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Senior Managers 1 0 1 0 0 0
Middle & Other Managers 3 2 1 0 0 Table Note *
Professionals 43 20 23 0 Table Note * 0
Semi-Professionals and Technicians 2 1 1 0 0 Table Note *
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel 6 0 6 0 Table Note * 0
Clerical Personnel 1 0 1 0 0 Table Note *
Totals 56 23 33 0 5 Table Note *

Table 5: Employee Regrettable Departures by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017

Table 5: Employee Regrettable Departures by Employment Equity Groups and by Occupational Groups
1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017
Occupational Group Total Men Women Aboriginal People Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Senior & Middle Managers 5 0 5 0 0 0
Professionals 19 11 8 0 0 0
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel 5 0 5 0 Table Note * 0
Clerical Personnel 4 0 4 0 0 0
Totals 33 11 22 0 Table Note * 0

Note: Occupational Groups will not add up to the totals as employees may belong to more than one designated groups.

Table 6: Workforce Availability – Women
Date: 2017-03-31

Table 6 Workforce Availability – Women
Date: 2016-03-31
Employment Equity Occupational Group All
Employees
#
Representation Availability Gap
# % % # #
01: Senior Managers 14 8 57.1% 22.2% 2 +6
02: Middle and Other Managers 32 13 40.6% 37.4% 10 +3
03: Professionals 288 174 60.4% 49.9% 135 +39
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 44 24 54.6% 48.6% 17 +7
05: Supervisors 4 4 100.0% 55.0% 2 +2
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 53 45 84.9% 80.5% 53 -8
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0% 4.1% 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 51 41 80.4% 70.2% 15 +26
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 3 0 0.0% 14.5% 0 0
Total 490 309 234 +75

Table 7: Workforce Availability – Aboriginal Peoples
Date: 2017-03-31

Table 7 Workforce Availability – Aboriginal Peoples
Date: 2017-03-31
Employment Equity Occupational Group All
Employees
#
Representation Availability Gap
# % % # #
01: Senior Managers 14 0 0.0% 1.7% 0 0
02: Middle and Other Managers 33 0 0.0% 1.7% 0 0
03: Professionals 288 10 3.5% 1.4% 4 +6
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 44 Table Note * Table Note *% 2.6% 1 Table Note *
05: Supervisors 4 0 0.0% 3.1% 0 0
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 53 Table Note * Table Note *% 2.6% 2 Table Note *
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0% 4.2% 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 51 4 7.8% 3.0% 1 +3
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 3 Table Note * Table Note *% 3.5% 0 Table Note *
Total 490 22 8 +14

Table 8: Workforce Availability – Visible Minorities
Date: 2017-03-31

Table 8 Workforce Availability – Visible Minorities
Date: 2017-03-31
Employment Equity Occupational Group All Employees Representation Availability Gap
# # % % # #
01: Senior Managers 14 Table Note * Table Note *% 10.4% 1 Table Note *
02: Middle and Other Managers 32 4 12.5% 19.1% 5 -1
03: Professionals 288 44 15.3% 24.8% 67 -23
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 44 Table Note * Table Note *% 23.2% 8 Table Note *
05: Supervisors 4 0 0.0% 27.4% 1 -1
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 53 11 20.8% 16.5% 11 0
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0.0% 18.1% 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 51 13 25.5% 24.3% 5 +8
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 3 0 0.0% 33.1% 1 -1
Total 490 76 99 -23

Table 9: Workforce Availability – Persons with Disabilities
Date: 2017-03-31

Table 9 Workforce Availability – Persons with Disabilities
Date: 2017-03-31
Employment Equity Occupational Group All
Employees
Representation Availability Gap
# # % % # #
01/02: Managers 46 4 8.6% 6.3% 2 +2Table Note **
03: Professionals 288 12 4.1% 3.8% 10 +2
04: Semi-Professionals and Technicians 44 4 9.0% 4.6% 2 +2
05: Supervisors 4 0 0% 13.9% 0 0
07: Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 53 Table Note * Table Note *% 3.4% 2 Table Note *
09: Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 1 0 0% 3.8% 0 0
10: Clerical Personnel 51 4 7.8% 7.0% 1 +3
12: Semi-Skilled Manual Worker 3 0 0% 4.8% 0 0
Total 490 26 17 +9

Chart 1 – Employment Equity Representation Women from 2013 to 2017

Chart*nbsp;1 – Employment Equity Representation Women from 2013 to 2016

Graphic description

This bar chart compares the National Energy Board's (NEB's) number of Women employees to Canada's workforce availability of Women for the fiscal years 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17.
2014/15 NEB: 254
2014/15 Canada: 222
2015/16 NEB: 272
2015/16 Canada: 222
2016/17 NEB: 309
2016/17 Canada: 234

 

Chart 2 – Employment Equity Representation Aboriginal from 2013 to 2017

Chart 2 – Employment Equity Representation Aboriginal from 2013 to 2016

Graphic description

This bar chart compares the National Energy Board's (NEB's) number of Aboriginal employees to Canada's workforce availability of Aboriginals for the fiscal years 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17.
2014/15 NEB: 18
2014/15 Canada: 5
2015/16 NEB: 19
2015/16 Canada: 5
2016/17 NEB: 22
2016/17 Canada: 8

 

Chart 3 – Employment Equity Representation Visible Minorities from 2013 to 2017

Chart 3 – Employment Equity Representation Visible Minorities from 2013 to 2016

Graphic description

This bar chart compares the National Energy Board's (NEB's) number of Visible Minority employees to Canada's workforce availability of Visible Minorities for the fiscal years 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17.
2014/15 NEB: 60
2014/15 Canada: 75
2015/16 NEB: 65
2015/16 Canada: 75
2016/17 NEB: 76
2016/17 Canada: 99

 

Chart 4 – Employment Equity Representation Persons with Disabilities from 2013 to 2017

Chart 4 – Employment Equity Representation Persons with Disabilities from 2013 to 2016

Graphic description

This bar chart compares the National Energy Board's (NEB's) number of Persons with Disabilities employees to Canada's workforce availability of Persons with Disabilities for the fiscal years 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17.
2014/15 NEB: 15
2014/15 Canada: 19
2015/16 NEB: 15
2015/16 Canada: 19
2016/17 NEB: 26
2016/17 Canada: 17

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